Commercial Export Risks from Approval of Genetically Modified (GM) Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region

 
RABESA REPORT IV

   Commercial Export Risks from
  Approval of Genetically Modified
(GM) Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA
               Region

                           Robert Paarlberg
                            David Wafula
                             Isaac Minde
                          Judi W. Wakhungu

                African Centre for Technology Studies
                           Nairobi, Kenya

                                    2006

 Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region   i
RABESA REPORT IV

     © Robert Paarlberg, David Wafula, Isaac Minde and Judi W. Wakhungu, 2006

                      Published in Kenya in 2006 by Acts Press
                           P.O Box 45917, Nairobi, Kenya
                    ICRAF Complex, United Nations Avenue, Gigiri
                         Tel: (254-2) 7224700 or 7224718
                        Fax: 7224701, E-mail:acts@cgiar.org

                             Cataloguing-in-Publication Data

 Commercial export risks from approval of genetically modified (GM) crops in the
COMESA/ASARECA region/Robert Paarlberg, David Wafula, Isaac Minde and Judi
                W. Wakhungu—Nairobi, Kenya: ACTS Press

                                   ISBN 9966-41-144-5

ii   Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

                                    Table of Contents

Acknowledgements                                                                    iv
Abbreviations and Acronyms                                                           v
1.0 Introduction                                                                    1
2.0 Method                                                                           1
   2.1 Egypt                                                                         3
   2.2 Ethiopia                                                                      4
   2.3 Kenya                                                                         4
   2.4 Tanzania                                                                      5
   2.5 Uganda                                                                        6
   2.6 Zambia                                                                        7
3.0 Summarizing export risks in the worst case scenario                              8
   3.1 From the worst case to a more likely case                                     8
4.0 Understanding export risk fears                                                  9
5.0 Conclusion: The importance of exports within Africa                        10
Notes                                                                               11

                                  French Version
Remerciements                                                                       13
Abréviations et acronymes                                                           14
Note Synthetique                                                                    15
1.0 Introduction                                                                    16
2.0 Méthode                                                                         16
   2.1 Egypte                                                                       18
   2.2 Ethiopie                                                                     19
   2.3 Kenya                                                                        20
   2.4 Tanzanie                                                                     20
   2.5 Ouganda                                                                      21
   2.6 Zambie                                                                       22
3.0 Résumé des risques pour l’exportation dans le scénario
   de pire hypothèse                                                                23
   3.1 De scénario de pire hypothèse au cas plus probable                           23
4.0 Comprendre la crainte des risques pour l’exportation                            24
5.0 Conclusion: l’importance des exportations intra-africaines                      25
Notes                                                                               26

         Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region   iii
RABESA REPORT IV

                                 Acknowledgements

     The production of this report benefited from a number of persons. The
     RABESA National Resource Persons contributed tremendously. In particular
     we recognize Mr. David Nyameino (Kenya), Mr. Rashid Iregi (Kenya), Mr. Paul
     Wagubi (Uganda), Dr. Shaaban Mwinjaka (Tanzania) Prof. Ahmed Bahieldin
     (Egypt), Dr. Gezahegn Ayele (Ethiopia), Mr. Aberu Dagnew (Ethiopia) and Mr.
     Lovemore Simwanda (Zambia).

     We are grateful to Dr. Charles Mugoya (ASARECA) and Dr. Theresa Sengooba
     (PBS) for their valuable comments and suggestions.

     We wish to acknowledge with appreciation project implementation support that
     we received from Dr. Mike Hall (USAID/REDSO) and the entire COMESA
     secretariat. We particularly appreciate the efforts of Dr. Cris Muyunda, Dr.
     Chungu Mwila, Mr. Chikakula Miti and Mr. Shamseldin Mohamed Salim.

     We thank FAST-TRACK management services for language translation services.
     Finally, we extend our gratitude and appreciation to Harrison Maganga, Andrew
     Adwerah, Mary Muthoni and Brian Otiende of ACTS for research, logistical and
     publication support.

     The ideas and views expressed in this report should be attributed to the authors
     and do not in any way represent opinions or positions of the individuals and
     institutions acknowledged.

iv   Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

                      Abbreviations and Acronyms

ACTS         African Centre for Technology Studies

ASARECA      Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and
             Central Africa

COMESA       Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa

ECAPAPA      Eastern and Central Africa Programme for Agricultural Policy Analysis

GMOs         Genetically Modified Organisms

PBS          Programme for Biosafety Systems

RABESA       Regional Approach to Biotechnology and Biosafety Policy in Eastern
             and Southern Africa

ZNFU         Zambia National Farmers Union

       Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region   v
RABESA REPORT IV

                                    1.0 Introduction
African governments in the COMESA/ASARECA region occasionally refer to the commercial
export risks they might encounter if they were to begin approving the planting of genetically
modified (GM) agricultural crops within their own borders. It is well understood that many
consumers in some importing countries, particularly in Europe, would prefer not to purchase
and consume GM foods, and in deference to such consumers many governments in Europe
and elsewhere have placed increasingly strict labeling and tracing requirements on foods with
GM content, including imported foods. Some private importers in Europe have begun to make
purchases only from countries that do not plant GM crops, or only from countries that can
credibly segregate GM from non-GM crops. Under these circumstances, it is understandable
that African governments dependent exports of agricultural commodities to Europe
might hesitate to approve the planting of GM crops on grounds of commercial export risk.

These commercial export risks are real, but what is their magnitude? In this fourth RABESA
report we estimate the total dollar value of agricultural exports that might be lost by the six
countries under study, both in a “worst case” scenario and in a “more likely” case scenario.
The worst case is defined as one in which all exports of crops that might possibly be construed
as GM-tainted, are shunned by all importers. In the “more likely” case, these products are
shunned only by European importers (both EU and non-EU Europe). We learn from this exercise
that even in the worst case most African countries are quite safe from the commercial export
risks that might be associated with planting GM crops, because of the product composition of
their exports. Most of the crops they currently export – such as coffee, tea, sugar, banana,
cocoa, oil palm, or groundnuts – are crops for which GM varieties either do not yet exist, or are
not yet being planted anywhere commercially, so even the most GM-sensitive importers would
have no reason to shun these products. And most of Africa’s exports of crops that could be
seen as GM, such as maize, go not to GM-sensitive importers in Europe, but to other African
countries. This makes the issue one that African countries can resolve largely among themselves.

                                       2.0 Method
To estimate the commercial export losses the six RABESA study countries might suffer
if they were to approve the planting of crops such as Bt maize and Bt cotton, we must
examine both the composition and the direction of their current agricultural product
exports. This is most conveniently done through the electronic United Nations Commodity
Trade Statistics Database (UN Comtrade).1 Of the various product exports in this database
we must first construct a list of those that might be shunned by GM-sensitive importers,
following a decision by an exporter to begin planting GM crops such as maize or cotton.
This list would begin with the various agricultural crops approved at least somewhere
in the world for commercial planting. Table 1 lists these “possibly GM” crops as of 2005.

           Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region      1
RABESA REPORT IV

Table 1 Agricultural crops for which GM varieties are approved for commercial planting in at least one country, 2005
Soybean
Maize
Cotton
Canola (Rape)
Squash
Papaya
Tomato
Irish potato

This is a relatively short list of commodities that importers might worry as being “possibly GM”
once a country began to approve some GM crops for planting. Tobacco is not on this list because
the one country that originally approved GM tobacco for planting, China, has now formally
withdrawn that approval. Tomato and Irish potato are on this list even though few farmers are
now planting the approved GM varieties of these crops. Rice is not on this list because the
only country in the world that now plants GM rice commercially, Iran, began doing so on a
small scale in 2005, after the data collection phase of this study had already been completed.2

Our next step is to construct from this list of “possibly GM crops” a longer list of export products
derived from these crops that GM sensitive importers might shun. This longer list would include
all the crops listed above, plus all of the products from those crops (except for cotton lint or
fiber, which is an industrial product rather than a food or feed product). This expanded list of
products that importers might shun would also have to include, in a worst case scenario, animal
products such as meat, eggs, and dairy, since some consumers do not want products from
animals that have had access to GM feed, and once a country begins planting GM maize or GM
cotton it becomes hard to guarantee that none of the maize or cotton seed cake has been fed to
animals. Current importing rules in the EU do not place any restrictions or labeling requirements
on meats or other products from animals that might have been fed on GM crops, but on
occasion some private importers in Europe have shunned such products on their own initiative.

Using this method we can construct a longer list shown in Table 2 of “possibly GM export products.”
These products are grouped according to the categories used in the UN Comtrade database:

2     Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

Table 2 Possibly GM Export Products, 2005
Live Animals
Meat
Dairy, eggs, natural honey
Potato
Tomato
Papaya
Squash
Soybean and Rape, including oil, flour and meal
Maize
Maize flour and meal and bran
Maize hulled
Cottonseed, including oil and cake

With this list of products that might be shunned by importers in a worst case, if a country
began planting GM crops, we can use the UN Comtrade database to construct for each of the
six study countries a current export risk profile. This profile shows the current annual dollar
value of these “possibly GM” exports from each country, broken out by export destination.

                                                        2.1 Egypt
UN Comtrade data from 2003 show the following export risk profile for Egypt:

   Table 3 Export destinations of products that might be shunned if Egypt were to become a GM planting
                                            county (US dollars)

                                           World            Europe              Asia      Arab Countries      Africa (non-Arab)
  Live animals                         9,078,796           194,513             7,408           8,133,111               652,337
  Meat                                 1,690,037            42,104             3,531           1,601,106                41,365
  Dairy and eggs                      24,013,756           130,126            47,087          22,057,551               980,873
  Irish Potato                        43,971,552        36,874,165            24,078           7,073,310                     0
  Tomato                                 818,504           422,909             5,155             390,057                     0
  Papaya                                  14,559            10,245                 0               4,314                     0
  Soybean, Rape, flour and                  2,879                 0                 0               2,698                     0
  meal
  Maize, meal, hulled, and               508,430            58,750          258,433              191,247                         0
  bran
  Cottonseed oil-cake*                     12,684                                                 12,684
  Total value per destination          80,111,197       37,732,812          345,692           39,466,042             1,674,575

*Seed and oil exports not reported for 2003 by UN Comtrade. FAOSTAT shows $44,000 cottonseed oil exports to the world in 2003,
and no exports of seed. Source: UN Comtrade, data from 2003 most recent available

                 Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region                                      3
RABESA REPORT IV

Table 3 shows that a significant share (47 percent) of Egypt’s exports of products
that might be shunned do go to Europe, and the total value of these exports at risk is
significant ($80.1 million total, $37.7 million specifically to Europe). Yet it is noteworthy
that only a tiny share of this exported value takes the form of direct exports to Europe
of maize or cottonseed products. Most of Egypt’s export risks derive instead from the
possible – but far less probable – rejection of animal products possibly raised on GM feed.

                                               2.2 Ethiopia
UN Comtrade data from 2003 reveal the following export risk profile for Ethiopia:

Table 4 Export destinations of products that might be shunned as “possibly GM” if Ethiopia were to become
                                    a GM planting county (US dollars)

                               World         Europe                Asia       Arab Countries    Africa (non-Arab)
    Live animals           1,098,531              0               1,078           1,092,675                     0
    Meat                   6,399,869          27,425            17,317             6,306,464              37,405
    Dairy and eggs          163,434            1,877               786              157,239                    0
    Irish Potato           1,242,425               0                 0             1,242,280                   0
    Tomato                   941,200               0                 0               940,635                   0
    Papaya                    40,839               0                 0                40,839                   0
    Soybean, Rape,           313,456          15,441                 0                66,505                   0
    flour and meal
    Maize, meal,            101,457               0                  0              101,192                    0
    hulled, and bran
    Cottonseed oil-               0               0                  0                    0                    0
    cake*
    Total value per       10,301,211          44,803            19,181             9,947,829              37,405
    destination
*Seed and oil exports not reported for 2003 by UN Comtrade. FAOSTAT shows $143,000 seed and oil exports to the
world in 2003.

Source: UN Comtrade, data from 2003 most recent available.

Ethiopia, like Egypt, also exports very few maize or cottonseed products. Most of the
Ethiopian exports that might be shunned as “possibly GM” are animals or animal
products, again a secondary risk. Nearly all go to the Arab world, rather than to Europe.

                                                 2.3 Kenya
UN Comtrade data from 2003 show the following export risk profile for Kenya:

4      Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

Table 5 Export destinations of products that might be shunned as “possibly GM” if Kenya were to become a
                                     GM planting county (US dollars)

                              World        Europe            Asia     Arab Countries   Africa (non-Arab)

  Live animals             1,239,497        2,738              0            457,300            776,871
  Meat                     2,279,049        5,092       155,961           1,272,770             648,404
  Dairy and eggs           1,970,881        1,105             0             185,397           1,476,117
  Irish Potato               71,778           631              0              3,317              59,251
  Tomato                     22,570         3,234              0              3,561                   0
  Papaya                     27,756        10,561              0             15,405                   0

  Soybean, Rape,           1,001,204          599              0            174,522            826,083
  flour and meal
  Maize, meal,             2,689,410        2,059              0             50,964           2,636,183
  hulled, and bran
  Cottonseed oil-            58,904             0              0                  0              30,841
  cake*
  Total per               14,649,057       32,957       155,961           2,181,767         11,667,795
  destination

*Seed and oil exports not reported for 2003 by UN Comtrade. FAOSTAT shows $206,000 in cottonseed oil
exports from Kenya to the world in 2003.

Source: UN Comtrade, data from 2003 most recent available.

The products Kenya exports that might be shunned as “possibly GM” go primarily to other
African (and non-Arab) countries. Kenya has very little exposure to export risks in Europe.
The total value of all of Kenya’s GM-sensitive product exports to all of Europe in 2003 was
just $32,957, and maize and cottonseed products were only a tiny part of this tiny total.

                                             2.4 Tanzania
UN Comtrade data from 2003 show the following export risks for Tanzania:

Table 6 Export destinations of products that might be shunned as “possibly GM” if Tanzania were to become
                                    a GM planting county (US dollars)

                                World       Europe         Asia       Arab Countries   Africa (non-Arab)
  Live animals              1,281,242      542,302      170,818             356,906              43,324
  Meat                        122,065            0      117,401               4,647                   0
  Dairy and eggs            1,296,494      755,234      145,709              86,134             306,489
  Irish Potato                271,093       57,945            0               6,989             205,998
  Tomato                      141,094        1,309            0              38,078             101,418
  Papaya                            0            0            0                   0                   0

                 Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region            5
RABESA REPORT IV

    Soybean, Rape,             260,558             0           2,133               1,951              256,012
    flour and meal
    Maize, meal,          19,372,062          50,867          78,446             220,669          18,709,758
    hulled, and bran
    Cottonseed oil-        2,484,068          63,410         151,882             424,918            1,843,858
    cake*
    Total value per       25,629,488       1,471,067         666,389           1,140,292          21,466,857
    destination

*Seed and oil exports not reported for 2003 by UN Comtrade. FAOSTAT shows $367,000 in cottonseed and
oil exports from Tanzania to the world in 2003.

Source: UN Comtrade, data from 2003 most recent available.

Tanzania is slightly more exposed to export risks in Europe than Kenya, but largely of the less
probable kind: sales of animal and dairy products from animals possibly raised on GM feed.
Direct sales of maize or cottonseed products are oriented to Africa, not Europe. Tanzania’s
total maize and maize product exports to all of Europe in 2003 were valued at only $50,867.

                                                2.5 Uganda
UN Comtrade data for Uganda in 2003 reveal the following export risk profile:

Table 7 Export destinations of products that might be shunned as “possibly GM” if Uganda were to become
                                    a GM planting county (US dollars)

                               World          Europe              Asia       Arab Countries    Africa (non-Arab)
    Live animals           48,233              3,941            40,940                     0             2,631
    Meat                        0                  0                 0                     0                 0
    Dairy and eggs         24,499              4,837                 0                     0            19,535
    Irish Potato            5,500                  0                 0                     0             5,500
    Tomato                 23,867                  0                 0                     0            23,817
    Papaya                      0                  0                 0                     0                 0
    Soybean,              645,217                  0                 0                     0           645,069
    Rape, flour and
    meal
    Maize, meal,        6,873,161              5,720                   0                   0          6,867,441
    hulled, and
    bran
    Cottonseed oil                0                0                   0                   0                    0
    and cake
    Total value per     7,620,477             14,498            40,940                     0          7,238,709
    destination

*Seed and oil exports not reported for 2003 by UN Comtrade. FAOSTAT shows $155,000 in cottonseed exports from
Uganda to the world in 2003.

Source: UN Comtrade, data from 2003 most recent available.

6       Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

Table 7 reveals that Uganda, a land-locked country, exports almost all of its “possibly GM
products” to other countries in Africa. Uganda’s maize and maize product sales to Europe in
2003 totaled just $5,720.

                                             2.6 Zambia
UN Comtrade data from 2002 (the latest year available) reveal the following export risk
profile for Zambia:

Table 8 Export destinations of products that might be shunned as “possibly GM” if Zambia were to become
                                    a GM planting county (US dollars)

                              World         Europe             Asia    Arab Countries     Africa (non-Arab)
  Live animals              318,291         25,152            5,946            1,945               262,238
  Meat                      288,590              0                0                 0              285,807
  Dairy and eggs          1,079,326        187,997                0                 0              889,629

  Irish Potato              71,465              0                0                 0                71,465
  Tomato                    39,591              0                0                 0                39,591
  Papaya                          0             0                0                 0                     0
  Soybean, Rape,          1,094,368             0                                  0             1,094,368
  flour and meal
  Maize, meal,            2,601,269             0            15,220                0             2,238,718
  hulled, and bran
  Cottonseed              1,816,430             0                0                 0             1,816,430
  and oil-cake*
  Total value per         7,540,330        395,639           21,166            1,945             7,044,949
  destination

*Oil exports not reported for 2002 by UN Comtrade.

Source: UN Comtrade, data from 2003 most recent available.

Zambia’s exports of products that might be shunned as “possibly GM,” if Zambia were to begin
planting GM crops, go almost entirely to other African countries. Zambia was a significant
exporter of cotton seeds in 2002, but all these exports went to other African countries, and 94
percent actually went to South Africa, which itself is a grower of GM cotton. Zambia is an exporter
of one product – natural honey – that had to be examined using a different data base (HS 2002
rather than HS 1996). In 2002 Zambia exported a total value of $231,000 worth of natural
honey, and 79 percent of that went to Europe (UK and Germany). This is another product that
might be shunned by some GM-sensitive importers if Zambia were to begin planting GM crops.
For the other five countries in this study exports of natural honey are negligible or not reported.

                 Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region               7
RABESA REPORT IV

     3.0 Summarizing Export Risks in the Worst Case Scenario
We have calculated the absolute magnitude of commercial export risks from planting GM in a
“worst case scenario,” when all destination countries shun all exports that might be considered GM
or GM-tainted, including animal products that might have been raised on GM feed. The absolute
value of these exports at risk is important, yet so is their value relative to all agricultural exports
from the countries in question. Table 9 summarizes both the total value of these exports that might
be shunned in the worst case scenario, and the share of total agricultural exports they represent:

Table 9 Total Value and Relative Share of Agricultural Exports that might be shunned as following planting of
                                     GM crops: Worst Case Scenario

                                                        Agricultural Food and Feed Product Exports, 2003
                         Total ($ million)   Of   which “might be         Share of Total Agricultural
                                                  shunned” ($ million)    Exports that “might be shunned”

    Egypt                            938                        80.1                                8.5%
    Ethiopia                         450                        10.3                                2.2%
    Kenya                           1291                        14.6                                1.1%
    Tanzania                         408                        25.6                                6.2%
    Uganda                           116                          7.6                               6.5%
    Zambia*                          119                        7.5**                               6.3%

*Data for Zambia are 2002: **Includes natural honey

The above figures show that in the “worst case,” agricultural exports from the
study countries would drop only slightly. Egypt’s 8.5 percent drop in exports would
be the largest, and Kenya’s 1.1 percent export decline would be the smallest.

                   3.1 From the Worst Case to a More Likely Case
In the worst case scenario shown above, it was assumed that all importers would
terminate purchases of all “possibly GM” or “possibly GM-tainted” products from the
six study countries. A more likely case is that only European importers would go this far
in shunning imports, if an African country began planting GM maize or GM cotton. Table
10 shows the share of export value that would be lost in this more likely scenario:

8       Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

Table 10 More Likely Case: Export losses if all European importers shunned all “possibly GM” and possibly
                                          GM-tainted” products

                                                       Agricultural Food and Feed Product Exports, 2003
                             Total    Of which “possibly GM” and exported to       Share     of     total
                                                                        Europe              exports lost
                        ($ million)
                                                                     ($ million)

  Egypt                       938                                          37.7                      .040
  Ethiopia                    450                                           .04                   .00009
  Kenya                      1291                                           .03                   .00002
  Tanzania                    408                                           1.5                      .004
  Uganda                      116                                           .01                   .00009
  Zambia*                     119                                             .2                     .002

*Data for Zambia are 2002, and include natural honey

Estimates of export losses in this more likely case reveal that only Egypt would see
its total agricultural exports decline by a significant margin (4 percent). The other
five study countries would see their exports decline by less than 1 percent, and in
three cases (Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda) by less than one tenth of one percent.

                     4.0 Understanding Export Risk Fears
The data presented here suggest that even in the worst case scenario, total agricultural
exports would shrink by less than 10 percent in all six study countries, and that in a more
likely scenario exports would shrink in all of the study countries except Egypt by much less
than 1 percent. With such small losses as these to contemplate, why do governments in Africa
so often mention commercial export risks as a reason not to plant GM crops? In the case
of Zambia, where anxieties about export losses were explicitly raised in 2002, the products
most often mentioned on that occasion were honey and baby corn. In November, 2003,
the President of Zambia’s National Farmer’s Union (ZNFU) made the following statement:

The food shortages of 2001/2002 season brought about the issue of GMO relief maize
for Zambia. The Government made a stand not to allow GMO maize in the country.
This has also been the stand of the ZNFU on GMOs. A major factor is the position
of European importers that if Zambia adopted GMO crops, exports of crops such as
tobacco, sweet corn, baby corn and organic products from Zambia will not be accepted.3

 There are two aspects to this statement that call for attention. First, it is not clear why European
importers would stop buying tobacco from Zambia in the event that Zambia planted GM crops,
since GM tobacco is not currently a commercialized crop anywhere, not even in the United States.
Second, it is not clear why European importers would stop buying all organic products from
Zambia. The import of organic maize or organic cotton might stop (particularly if Zambians planted

             Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region                        9
RABESA REPORT IV

GM maize and GM cotton without adequate segregation from non-GM crops) but the many other
organic products grown in Zambia cannot be affected biologically by pollen from maize or cotton
plants, so they could remain organically certified even if grown alongside GM maize or cotton.

One other way to judge the likely effects on exports of planting GM crops is to consider the
experience of the Republic of South Africa, which has been planting GM crops widely and
without careful segregation since 1997. UN Comtrade data do not show any significant decline
in South Africa’s exports of fruits and vegetables to Europe in the wake of this decision to
plant GM maize, soy, and cotton. Table 11 shows significant growth in South Africa’s fruit
and vegetable exports to Germany and the UK, specifically, over the past five years:

Table 11 Exports of Fruits and Vegetables from Republic of South Africa to Germany and UK, 2000-2004

  Year                 Exports to Germany       Exports to UK
                               ($ millions)        ($ millions)
  2004                                  87                 280
  2003                                  72                 213
  2002                                  44                 144
  2001                                  38                 129
  2000                                  34                 138

Source: UN Comtrade

Thus, the one country in Africa that has gone ahead with the widespread and unsegregated
planting of GM crops has not seen its aggregate exports to Europe of fruits and vegetables suffer.

          5.0 Conclusion: The importance of exports within Africa
This trade data review suggests that, except perhaps for Egypt, the study countries in this
project need not fear significant commercial export losses if they make a decision to plant any of
the GM commodities currently on the market. This is because most of the agricultural products
they export (in each case, more than 90 percent by value) have not been commercialized
yet in a GM form and could not be seen by importers as “possibly GM.” The trade data also
suggest that if the countries in the COMESA/ASARECA region remain concerned about losing
maize or maize product exports in particular, they should not be so focused on the more
distant import policies of countries in Asia, Europe, or the Arab world. For Kenya, Tanzania,
Uganda, and Zambia, virtually all maize and maize product exports go to other African states:

Table 12 Share of total maize exports going to (non-Arab) African countries

 Egypt               0%
 Ethiopia            0%
 Kenya               98%
 Tanzania            96%
 Uganda              99%
 Zambia*             86%
*Data from 2002. :Source: Calculated from Tables 3,4,5,6,7,8

10       Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

A conclusion may be drawn that the export risks faced by most African governments over GM
crops are not only small; they are also largely manageable by Africans alone. The magnitude of
commercial export risk will depend, most of all, on the import policies African governments select
toward their own African neighbors.

                                            Notes
1. UN Comtrade, at http://unstats.un.org/unsd/comtrade/

2. In addition, the government of Iran has said it does not plan to grow GM rice on a large
    scale without additional approvals from its own biosafety committees and from “relevant
    international organizations.”

3. Guy Robinson, President of Zambia National Farmers Union. Communique to Zambia
   Agricultural Investment Promotion Conference, November 2003. http://64.233.187.104/
   search?q=cache:lInrgF8gKLcJ:www.boz.zm

           Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region      11
RABESA REPORT IV

                       RAPPORT RABESA IV

             Risques pour les exportations
        commerciales en cas d’autorisation des
        cultures génétiquement modifiées (GM)
        dans la région du COMESA/ASARECA

12   Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

                                     Remerciements

La production du présent rapport a bénéficié du concours de plusieurs personnes. Les cadres
nationaux de RABESA ont y énormément contribué. Il convient de remercier plus particulièrement
M. David Nyameino (Kenya), M. Rashid Iregi (Kenya), M. Paul Wagubi (Uganda), D. Shaaban
Mwinjaka (Tanzanie), Prof. Ahmed Bahieldin (Egypte), Dr. Gezahegn Ayele (Ethiopie), Mr. Aberu
Dagnew (Ethiopie) et M. Lovemore Simwanda (Zambie).

Notre reconnaissance va au Dr. Charles Mugoya (ASARECA) et au Dr. Theresa Sengooba (PBS)
pour leurs précieux commentaires et suggestions.

Nous voudrions apprécier avec gratitude l’appui à la mise en œuvre du projet dont nous avons
bénéficié de la part du Dr. Mike Hall (USAID/REDSO) et de tout le Secrétariat du COMESA.
Nous sommes particulièrement reconnaissants au Dr. Cris Muyunda, au Dr. Chungu Mwila, à MM.
Chikakula Miti et Shamseldin Mohamed Salim.

Nos remerciements vont également à la direction de FAST-TRACK pour leurs services de traduction.
Enfin, nous exprimons notre gratitude et appréciation à Harrison Maganga, Andrew Adwerah,
Mary Muthoni et Brian Otiende de ACTS pour leur appui quant à la recherche, la logistique et la
publication du document.

Les idées et les opinions exprimées dans le présent rapport sont ceux des auteurs et ne représentent
en aucun cas les opinions ou les positions des personnes ou des institutions citées.

           Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region        13
RABESA REPORT IV

                              Abréviations et acronymes

ACTS               Centre africain pour les études de technologie

ASARECA            Association pour le renforcement de la recherche agricole en Afrique orientale
                   et centrale

COMESA             Marché commun de l’Afrique orientale et australe

ECAPAPA          Programme d’analyse des politiques agricoles en Afrique orientale et centrale

OGM                Organismes génétiquement modifiés

PBS                Programme de renforcement des systèmes de biosécurité

RABESA             Approche régionale à la biotechnologie et biosécurité en Afrique orientale et
                   australe

ZNFU               Zambia National Farmers Union – Union nationale des fermiers zambiens

14    Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

                                       Note Synthetique
L’Approche régionale à la politique de biotechnologie et biosécurité en Afrique orientale et
australe (initiative RABESA) est un projet qui a été initié et entériné par le Marché commun
de l’Afrique orientale et australe (COMESA)1 en 2003. L’initiative RABESA a été conçue en
vue d’examiner les ramifications potentielles des OGM sur le commerce, la sécurité alimentaire
et l’accès à l’aide alimentaire de secours dans les pays du COMESA et de l’ASARECA2.

L’objectif global de l’initiative est de générer et d’analyser les données techniques requises
pour informer les pays du COMESA et de l’ASARECA sur les choix et options de la politique
régionale en matière de biotechnologie et de biodiversité. Les objectifs spécifiques sont les suivants:

a. Mener dans les pays de l’ASARECA/COMESA, une analyse des parties prenantes en mettant
   en relief les opportunités, les défis, les opinions et les vues relatifs à leurs engagements en qui
   concerne le commerce, les OGM et la sécurité alimentaire;

b. Evaluer l’impact des cultures OGM sur les revenus agricoles dans la région de l’ASARECA /
        COMESA;

c. Analyser les risques commerciaux que les pays de l’ASARECA/COMESA sont susceptibles de
   connaître sur les marchés d’exportation tant au niveau régional qu’international, si l’autorisation
   de planter des cultures OGM est accordée.

d. Evaluer l’impact des politiques de précaution vis-à-vis des OGM sur l’accès à l’aide alimentaire
   de secours et la sécurité alimentaire dans la région de l’ASARECA/COMESA; et

e. Identifier une série d’options de politique régionale en matière de biosécurité pour le processus
   décisionnel sur les OGM et le commerce dans les pays de l’ASARECA/ COMESA.

L’Association pour le renforcement de la recherche agricole en Afrique orientale et centrale
(ASARECA), le Programme d’analyses des politiques agricoles en Afrique orientale et centrale
(ECAPAPA)3, le Programme de renforcement des systèmes de biosécurité (PBS)4 et le Centre
africain pour les études de technologie (ACTS) 5 appuient techniquement le COMESA dans la mise
en œuvre de l’initiative RABESA.

Le présent rapport analyse de façon critique les risques potentiels pour les exportations
commerciales que les pays de la région du COMESA et de l’ASARECA peuvent rencontrer si
les autorités de régulation de la biosécurité décident d’introduire et de commercialiser les OGM.

           Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region          15
RABESA REPORT IV

                                       1.0 Introduction
Les gouvernements africains de la région du COMESA/ASARECA parlent de temps en temps des
risques pour les exportations commerciales qu’ils pourraient rencontrer s’ils devaient commencer à
autoriser la plantation de cultures génétiquement modifiées (GM) à l’intérieur de leurs frontières. Il est
évident que beaucoup de consommateurs dans certains pays importateurs, particulièrement en Europe,
préféreraient ne pas acheter ni consommer des aliments GM. Par déférence à ces consommateurs,
beaucoup de gouvernements en Eeurope et ailleurs ont imposé des conditions strictes d’étiquetage et
de tracabilité sur les aliments contenant des OGM, y compris les importations alimentaires. Certains
importateurs privés en Europe ont commencé à acheter uniquement dans les pays qui ne produisent
pas de cultures GM ou importent seulement des pays pouvant de façon crédible séparer les cultures
GM des produits non GM. Dans ces circonstances, il est compréhensible que les gouvernements
africains qui dépendent de l’exportation de produits agricoles vers l’Europe puissent hésiter à autoriser
la plantation de cultures GM au motif du risque encouru pour leurs exportations commerciales.

Ces risques pour les exportations commerciales sont bien réels, mais quelle en est leur ampleur ?
Dans ce quatrième rapport de RABESA, nous estimons le manque à gagner en dollars pour les six
pays étudiés exportateurs de produits agricoles, tant dans le scénario de « pire hypothèse » que dans
celui d’«hypothèse plus probable. » Le scénario de pire hypothèse est défini comme le cas où toutes
les exportations agricoles qui pourraient être considérées comme entachées de GM seraient évitées
par tous les importateurs. Dans le scénario d’« hypothèse plus probable», ces produits sont évités
par les importateurs européens uniquement (Europe UE et Europe non-UE). Nous apprenons de
cette étude que même dans la pire hypothèse, la plupart des pays africains sont exempts des risques
pour les exportations commerciales qui proviendraient de la plantation de cultures GM, à cause de la
composition de leurs produits d’exportation. La plupart des cultures qu’ils exportent actuellement
- café, thé, sucre, bananes, cacao, huile de palme ou cacahuètes – sont des produits pour lesquels les
variétés GM n’existent pas encore ou ne sont pas encore commercialement plantées. Par conséquent,
même les importateurs les plus sensibles aux GM n’auraient aucune raison de rejeter ces produits. Et
la plupart des exportations africaines de cultures qui pourraient être considérées comme GM ne se
dirigent pas vers les importateurs sensibles au GM de l’Europe mais plutôt dans d’autres pays africains.
Ainsi la question s’avère-t-elle un problème que les pays africains peuvent résoudre eux-mêmes.

                                           2.0 Méthode
Pour estimer le manque à gagner en termes dʼexportations commerciales que les six pays
couverts par lʼétude de RABESA pourraient subir sʼils autorisent la plantation des cultures
comme le maïs Bt et le coton Bt, nous devons examiner la composition et la direction de leurs
exportations agricoles actuelles. Lʼévaluation est plus commodément réalisée à travers la Base
de données des statistiques commerciales des Nations Unies (UN Comtrade).6 Des différents
produits dʼexportation figurant dans cette base de données, nous devons dresser une liste de
ceux qui pourraient être rejetés par les importateurs sensibles aux GM, si un exportateur décide
de commencer à planter des cultures GM comme le maïs ou le coton. Cette liste commencera
avec les diverses cultures agricoles dont la plantation commerciale est autorisée du moins
quelque part dans le monde. Le Tableau 1 énumère ses cultures « éventuellement GM » en 2005.

16   Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

  Tableau 1 Cultures dont les variétés GM sont autorisées pour plantation commerciale
                             dans un pays au moins, 2005

Soja

Maïs

Coton

Colza

Courge

Papaye

Tomate

Pomme de terre irlandaise

C’est une liste relativement courte des produits dont les importateurs pourraient s’inquiéter
qu’ils sont « éventuellement GM » une fois qu’un pays commence à autoriser la plantation
de quelques cultures GM. Le tabac ne figure pas sur cette liste car le seul pays qui avait
originellement autorisé la plantation de tabac GM, la Chine, a formellement retiré l’approbation.
La tomate et la pomme de terre irlandaise figurent sur la liste même si peu d’agriculteurs
plantent actuellement les variétés GM autorisées de ces cultures. Le riz ne figure pas sur la liste
car le seul pays au monde qui plante du riz GM, l’Iran, a commencé à le faire sur une petite
échelle en 2005, après que la collecte des données pour la présente étude ait été déjà achevée.7

Notre étape suivante est de dresser à partir de cette liste de « cultures éventuellement GM » une
liste plus longue de produits d’exportation dérivés de ces cultures que les importateurs sensibles
au GM pourraient rejeter. Cette liste plus longue comprendra toutes les cultures énumérées
ci-dessus, plus tous les produits qui en sont dérivés (sauf le tissu ouaté ou fibre de coton, qui
est un produit industriel plutôt qu’un produit alimentaire ou un aliment pour animaux). Cette
liste étendue des produits que les importateurs pourraient rejeter va aussi inclure, dans un cas
de pire hypothèse, les produits d’origine animale comme la viande, les œufs, et les produits
laitiers, comme certains consommateurs ne veulent pas de produits provenant d’animaux
nourris aux aliments GM, et une fois qu’un pays commence à planter le maïs GM ou le coton
GM, il devient difficile de garantir que leurs dérivés n’ont pas alimenté les animaux. Les règles
d’importation actuelles dans l’UE n’imposent pas de restrictions ou des exigences d’étiquetage
sur les viandes ou les autres produits provenant d’animaux qui auraient été nourris de cultures
GM, mais certains importateurs privés en Europe ont rejeté ces produits sur leur propre initiative.

Avec cette méthode nous pouvons dresser une liste plus longue telle qu’elle apparaît
au Tableau 2 de « produits d’exportation éventuellement GM ». Ces produits sont
répartis suivant les catégories utilisées de la base de données du UN Comtrade:

            Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region      17
RABESA REPORT IV

                        Tableau 2 Produits dʼexportations éventuellement GM, 2005
Animaux vivants
Viande
Produits laitiers, œuf, miel naturel
Pomme de terre
Tomate
Papaye
Courge
Soja et colza, y compris l’huile et la farine
Maïs
Farine de maïs et son
Maïs décortiqué
Graines de coton, y compris l’huile et les tourteaux

Avec cette liste de produits que les importateurs pourraient éviter en cas de pire hypothèse si un
pays commence à planter des cultures GM, nous pouvons utiliser la base de données UN Comtrade
pour tracer pour chacun des six pays étudiés, un profil actuel des risques pour l’exportation. Ce
profil montre la valeur annuelle actuelle en dollars de ces exportations « éventuellement GM » pour
chaque pays, répartie suivant le marché de destination.

                                                       2.1 Egypte
Les données de UN Comtrade depuis 2003 montre le profil des risques de l’Egypte pour l’exportation
ci-après:
 Tableau 3 Les destinations des produits qui pourraient être évités si l’Egypte devenait un pays planteur de
                                             GM (dollars US )

                                   Monde           Europe              Asie         Pays arabes   Afrique (non arabe)
  Animaux vivants               9.078.796         194.513             7.408           8.133.111              652.337
  Viande                        1.690.037          42.104             3.531           1.601.106               41.365
  Produits laitiers            24.013.756         130.126            47.087          22.057.551              980.873
  oeufs
  Pomme de terre               43.971.552       36.874.165           24.078           7.073.310                    0
  irlandaise
  Tomate                          818.504         422.909             5.155            390.057                     0
  Papaye                           14.559          10.245                 0              4.314                     0
  Soja, colza, farine               2.879               0                0                2.698                    0
  Maïs,                           508.430          58.750           258.433            191.247                     0
  Farine de maïs,
  décortiqué, et son
  Huile de coton                   12.684                                               12.684
  huile-tourteaux*
  Valeur totale par            80.111.197       37.732.812          345.692          39.466.042            1.674.575
  destination

*UN Comtrade n’indique pas les exportations de graines et d’huile pour 2003. FAOSTAT montre des exportations vers le
                  monde d’huile de coton pour 44.000 $ en 2003 mais pas d’exportation de graines.

18     Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

Source: UN Comtrade, données à partir de 2003 sont les plus récentes disponibles

Le Tableau 3 montre qu’une part importante (47 pour cent) des exportations égyptiennes qui
pourraient être évitées vont effectivement en Europe, et la valeur totale de ces exportations à
risque est substantielle (80,1 millions $, 37,7 millions $ spécifiquement vers l’Europe).
Cependant, il convient de noter qu’une part minime seulement de cette valeur exportée consiste
en exportations directes vers l’Europe de produits à base de maïs ou de graines de coton. La
plupart des risques de l’Egypte pour l’exportation proviennent plutôt du possible – mais très
peu probable _ rejet des produits d’origine animale éventuellement nourris aux aliments GM.

                                                           2.2 Ethiopie
Les données de UN Comtrade pour 2003 montre le profil des risques de l’Ethiopie pour l’exportation
ci-après:

    Tableau 4: Les destinations des produits qui pourraient être évités comme « éventuellement GM » si
                         l’Ethiopie devenait un pays planteur de GM (dollars US ).

                                   Monde                 Europe                     Asie           Pays arabes        Afrique      (non
                                                                                                                                 Arabe)
  Animaux vivants               1.098.531                      0                  1.078               1.092.675                       0
  Viande                        6.399.869                 27.425                 17.317               6.306.464                  37.405
  Produits laitiers               163.434                  1.877                    786                 157.239                       0
  oeufs
  Pomme de terre                1.242.425                      0                       0              1.242.280                        0
  irlandaise
  Tomate                          941.200                      0                       0                940.635                        0
  Papaye                           40.839                      0                       0                 40.839                        0
  Soja, colza,                    313.456                 15.441                       0                 66.505                        0
  farine
  Farine de maïs,                 101.457                      0                       0                101.192                        0
  maïs décortiqué,
  et son
  Huile de coton                         0                     0                       0                       0                       0
  huile-tourteaux*
  Valeur totale par            10.301.211                 44.803                 19.181               9.947.829                  37.405
  destination

 *UN Comtrade n’indique pas les exportations de graines et d’huile pour 2003. FAOSTAT montre des exportations de graines et d’huile vers le
           monde pour 143.000$ en 2003.: Source: UN Comtrade, les données à partir de 2003 sont les plus récentes disponibles.

L’Ethiopie, comme l’Egypte, exporte aussi très peu de produits à base de maïs ou de graines
de coton. La plupart des exportations éthiopiennes qui pourraient être évitées comme
« éventuellement GM » sont des animaux ou des produits d’origine animale, ce qui est encore une
fois un risque secondaire. Presque tous les produits vont vers monde arabe plutôt que l’Europe .

                                                            2.3 Kenya
Les données de UN Comtrade de 2003 montre le profil des risques du Kenya pour l’exportation ci-après:

               Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region                                              19
RABESA REPORT IV

   Tableau 5 Les destinations des produits qui pourraient être évités comme « éventuellement GM » si le
                           Kenya devenait un pays planteur de GM (dollars US )

                               Monde       Europe             Asie         Pays arabes     Afrique (non Arabe)
  Animaux vivants           1.239.497       2.738                0             457.300                 776.871
  Viande                    2.279.049       5.092          155.961           1.272.770                 648.404
  Produits laitiers         1.970.881       1.105                0             185.397               1.476.117
  oeufs
  Pomme de terre              71.778         631                 0                 3.317               59.251
  irlandaise
  Tomate                       22.570       3.234                0               3.561                      0
  Papaye                       27.756      10.561                0              15.405                      0
  Soja, colza, farine       1.001.204         599                0             174.522                826.083
  Farine de maïs,           2.689.410       2.059                0              50.964              2.636.183
  maïs décortiqué,
  et son
  Huile de coton huile        58.904               0             0                    0                30.841
  -tourteaux*
  Valeur totale par       14.649.057       32.957          155.961           2.181.767             11.667.795
  destination

     * UN Comtrade n’indique pas les exportations de graines et d’huile pour 2003. FAOSTAT montre des
               exportations d’huile de coton du Kenya vers le monde pour 206.000$ en 2003.

            Source: UN Comtrade, les données à partir de 2003 sont les plus récentes disponibles.

.Les produits du Kenya qui pourraient être rejetés comme « éventuellement GM » vont
principalement vers les autres pays africains (et non arabes). Le Kenya est très peu exposé
aux risques pour l’exportation vers l’Europe. La valeur totale de toutes les exportations
kenyanes sensibles au GM dans toute l’Europe en 2003 était de juste 32.957$, et les produits
à base de maïs et de graines de coton étaient une part minime de ce total lui-même infime.

                                             2.4 Tanzanie
Les données de UN Comtrade de 2003 montre les risques de la Tanzanie pour l’exportation ci-après:

  Tableau 6 Les destinations des produits qui pourraient être évités comme « éventuellement GM » si la
                       Tanzanie devenait un pays planteur de GM (dollars US ).

                            Monde         Europe          Asie       Pays arabes           Afrique (non Arabe)
  Animaux vivants        1.281.242       542.302       170.818          356.906                         43.324
  Viande                   122.065             0       117.401             4.647                             0
  Produits laitiers      1.296.494       755.234       145.709            86.134                      306.489
  oeufs
  Pomme de terre          271.093         57.945            0              6.989                      205.998
  irlandaise
  Tomate                  141.094          1.309            0            38.078                       101.418
  Papaye                        0              0            0                 0                             0

20     Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

  Soja, colza, farine          260.558              0          2.133          1.951                          256.012
  Farine de maïs,           19.372.062         50.867         78.446        220.669                       18.709.758
  maïs décortiqué,
  et son
  Huile de coton             2.484.068         63.410        151.882        424.918                        1.843.858
  huile-tourteaux*
  Valeur totale par         25.629.488       1.471.067       666.389       1.140.292                      21.466.857
  destination

    *UN Comtrade n’indique pas les exportations de graines et d’huile pour 2003. FAOSTAT montre des
      exportations de graines et d’huile de coton de la Tanzanie vers le monde pour 367.000$ en 2003.
                  Source: UN Comtrade, les données de 2003 sont les plus récentes disponibles.

La Tanzanie est légèrement plus exposée aux risques pour l’exportation vers l’Europe que le
Kenya, mais des risques largement du genre peu probable : ventes d’animaux et de produits laitiers
provenant d’animaux éventuellement nourris aux aliments GM. Les ventes directes de produits à
base de maïs ou de graines de coton vont vers l’Afrique, non l’Europe. Les exportations totales des
produits à base de maïs ou de graines de coton dans toute l’Europe en 2003 se chiffraient à 50.867$.

                                                   2.5 Ouganda
Les données de UN Comtrade pour l’Ouganda en 2003 montrent le profil des risques pour
l’exportation ci-après:
    Tableau 7 Les destinations des produits qui pourraient être évités comme « éventuellement GM » si
                        l’Ouganda devenait un pays planteur de GM (dollars US )

                                   Monde          Europe            Asie     Pays arabes         Afrique (non Arabe)
    Animaux vivants                48.233          3.941          40.940               0                       2.631
    Viande                              0              0               0               0                           0
    Produits laitiers              24.499          4.837               0               0                      19.535
    oeufs
    Pomme de terre                  5.500                0             0               0                       5.500
    irlandaise
    Tomate                         23.867               0              0               0                      23.817
    Papaye                              0               0              0               0                           0
    Soja, colza, farine           645.217               0              0               0                     645.069
    Maïs,                       6.873.161           5.720              0               0                   6.867.441
    Farine de maïs,
    maïs décortiqué,
    et son
    Huile de coton huile-                0               0             0               0                           0
    tourteaux*
    Valeur totale par           7.620.477          14.498         40.940               0                   7.238.709
    destination

 *UN Comtrade n’indique pas les exportations de graines et d’huile pour 2003. FAOSTAT montre des exportations de
                      graines de coton de l’Ouganda vers le monde pour 155.000$ en 2003.
                  Source: UN Comtrade, les données à partir de 2003 sont les plus récentes disponibles.

               Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region                          21
RABESA REPORT IV

Le Tableau 7 montre que l’Ouganda, un pays enclavé, exporte presque tous ses « produits
éventuellement GM » vers d’autres pays africains. Les ventes de maïs et de produit à base de maïs
en Europe en 2003 se chiffrait à juste 5.720$.

                                              2.6 Zambie
Les données de UN Comtrade pour 2002 (l’année la plus récente disponible) montrent le profil des
risques de la Zambie pour l’exportation ci-après:

  Tableau 8 Les destinations des produits qui pourraient être évités comme « éventuellement GM » si la
                         Zambie devenait un pays planteur de GM (dollars US)

                           Monde            Europe             Asie         Pays arabes    Afrique       (non
                                                                                                       Arabe)
  Animaux vivants         318.291            25.152           5.946               1.945               262.238
  Viande                  288.590                 0               0                   0               285.807
  Produits laitiers     1.079.326           187.997               0                   0               889.629
  oeufs
  Pomme de terre           71.465                0               0                     0               71.465
  irlandaise
  Tomate                   39.591                0               0                     0               39.591
  Papaye                        0                0               0                     0                    0
  Soja, colza,          1.094.368                0                                     0             1.094.368
  farine
  Maïs,                 2.601.269                0           15.220                    0             2.238.718
  Farine de maïs,
  maïs décortiqué,
  et son
  Huile de coton        1.816.430                0               0                     0             1.816.430
  huile-tourteaux*
  Valeur totale par     7.540.330           395.639          21.166               1.945              7.044.949
  destination

                        *UN Comtrade n’indique pas d’exportations d’huile pour 2002.

            Source: UN Comtrade, les données à partir de 2003 sont les plus récentes disponibles.

Les exportations zambiennes de produits qui pourraient être évités comme « éventuellement GM »,
si la Zambie commençait à planter des cultures GM vont presque entièrement dans d’autres pays
africains. La Zambie était un exportateur important de graines de coton en 2002, mais toutes ces
exportations allaient vers d’autres pays africains, et 94 pour cent allaient en fait en Afrique du Sud,
qui est elle-même productrice de coton GM. La Zambie exporte un seul produit – miel naturel – qui
a dû être examiné sur base de données différentes (SH 2002 plutôt que SH 1996). En 2002, la Zambie
a exporté pour une valeur totale de 231.000$ de miel naturel, et 79 pour cent est allé en Europe
(Royaume-Uni et Allemagne). C’est un autre produit que pourraient être évité par les importateurs
sensibles aux GM si la Zambie commençait à planter des cultures GM. Pour les autres cinq pays
couverts par la présente étude, les exportations de miel naturel sont négligeables et ne sont pas signalées.

22    Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
RABESA REPORT IV

3.0 Résumé des risques pour lʼexportation dans le scénario de pire
                           hypothèse
Nous avons calculé l’ampleur absolue des risques des cultures GM pour les exportations commerciales
dans le scénario de « pire hypothèse », si tous les pays de destination évitaient toutes les exportations
qui seraient considérées comme GM ou entachées de GM, y compris les produits dérivés d’animaux
qui auraient été nourris aux aliments GM. La valeur absolue de ces exportations à risque est
importante, mais tout aussi significative est leur valeur par rapport à toutes les exportations agricoles
des pays en question. Le Tableau 9 résume la valeur totale de ces exportations qui pourraient
être évités dans la pire hypothèse, et la part des exportations agricoles totale qu’elles représentent:

   Tableau 9 Valeur totale et part relative des exportations agricoles qui pourraient être évitées suite à la
                                  plantation de culture GM: Pire hypothèse

                                                       Exportations de produits agricoles et d’aliments pour animaux, 2003
                            Total (millions $)     Dont “pourraient être évitées ”       Part des exportations agricoles
                                                                        (millions $)     totales qui “pourraient être évitées
                                                                                                                            ”
  Egypte                                 938                                   80.1                                     8.5%
  Ethiopie                               450                                   10.3                                     2.2%
  Kenya                                 1291                                   14.6                                     1.1%
                                         408                                    25.6                                   6.2%
                                          116                                    7.6                                   6.5%
  Zambie*                                 119                                   7.5**                                  6.3%

                                  *Les données pour la Zambie sont de 2002

                                                 **Inclut le miel naturel

Les chiffres ci-dessus montrent que dans la « pire hypothèse », les exportations agricoles des pays
couverts par l’étude diminueraient très légèrement. La baisse de 8,5 pour cent pour l’Egypte serait
la plus importante, et la baisse de 1,1 pour cent des exportations du Kenya serait la plus petite.

               3.1 De scénario de pire hypothèse au cas plus probable
Dans le scénario de pire hypothèse , il a été supposé que tous les importateurs stopperaient l’achat
de tous les produits « éventuellement GM » ou « éventuellement entachés de GM » provenant des
six pays couverts par l’étude. Une hypothèse plus probable est que seuls les importateurs européens
iraient jusqu’à éviter les importations, si un pays africain commençait à planter du maïs GM ou
du coton GM. Le Tableau 10 montre la part des exportations. Le Tableau 10 montre le manque à
gagner dans cette hypothèse plus probable:

             Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region                                     23
RABESA REPORT IV

 Tableau 10: Hypothèse plus probable: manque à gagner si tous les importateurs européens évitaient tous
               les produits « éventuellement GM » et « éventuellement entachés de GM ».

                                            Exportations de produits agricoles et d’aliments pour animaux , 2003
               Total (millions$)   Dont   « éventuellement GM » et exportés en Europe                 Manque à gagner
                                                                                   (millions$)

  Egypte                   938                                                         37.7                      .040
  Ethiopie                 450                                                          .04                   .00009
  Kenya                   1291                                                          .03                   .00002
  Tanzanie                 408                                                          1.5                      .004
  Ouganda                  116                                                          .01                   .00009
  Zambie*                  119                                                            .2                     .002

                  *Les données pour la Zambie sont de 2002, et incluent le miel naturel

Les estimations des pertes d’exportation dans cette hypothèse plus probable montrent que seule
l’Egypte verrait ses exportations agricoles totales baisser d’une marge substantielle (4 pour cent).
Les autres cinq pays couverts par l’étude verraient leurs exportations diminuer de moins de 1
pour cent, et dans trois cas (Ethiopie, Kenya, et Ouganda) par moins d’un dixième d’un pour cent.

       4.0 Comprendre la crainte des risques pour lʼexportation
Les données présentées ici montrent que même dans le scénario de pire hypothèse, les
exportations agricoles totales baisseraient de moins de 10 pour cent dans tous les six pays
couverts par l’étude et que dans l’hypothèse plus probable, les exportations diminueraient
pour tous ces pays, sauf l’Egypte, de moins de 1 pour cent. Avec des pertes aussi minimes,
pourquoi les pays africains citent si souvent les risques pour les exportations commerciales
comme la raison de ne pas planter des cultures GM ? Dans le cas de la Zambie, où les craintes
à propos des pertes d’exportation ont été explicitement avancées en 2002, les produits le plus
souvent cités à cette occasion étaient le miel et le maïs tendre. En novembre 2003, le président
de l’Union nationale des fermiers zambiens (ZNFU) a prononcé la déclaration suivante:

Les pénuries alimentaires de la saison 2001/2002 ont soulevé en Zambie le problème du
maïs OGM de secours pour la Zambie. Le Gouvernement a décidé de ne pas autoriser le maïs
OGM dans le pays. Ce fut aussi la position de la ZNFU sur les OGM. La raison majeure est la
position des importateurs européens à savoir que si la Zambie adoptait les cultures OGM, les
exportations de tabac, de maïs, de maïs tendre et de produits organiques ne seraient pas acceptées.8

Deux aspects de cette déclaration méritent une attention particulière. Premièrement, on ne voit
pas pourquoi les importateurs européens stopperaient d’acheter le tabac de la Zambie en cas de
plantation de cultures GM puisque le tabac GM n’est actuellement commercialisé nulle part, même
pas aux Etats-Unis. Deuxièmement, on ne voit pas pourquoi les importateurs européens stopperaient
d’acheter les produits organiques de la Zambie. L’importation de maïs ou de coton organiques
pourrait s’arrêter (particulièrement si les zambiens plantaient du maïs et du coton GM sans séparation

24   Commercial Export Risks from Approval of GM Crops in the COMESA/ASARECA Region
Vous pouvez aussi lire
DIAPOSITIVES SUIVANTES ... Annuler